ISSUES

As we identify key issues, the Arizona Elk Society will provide more background information and a sample letter to enable our members and others to voice their position to the decision makers on that issue.

The Arizona Elk Society, in support of our mission, is committed to:

    Thirst Elk drinking water provided by AES
  • Conserving and enhancing wildlife habitat in Arizona.
  • Protecting and promoting our hunting heritage.
  • Promoting sound wildlife management and habitat through partnering with government agencies and other organizations.
  • Implementing special programs for youth education regarding conservation, hunting and outdoor activities.
  • Informing the general public about issues concerning wildlife conservation, as well as scientific and biological wildlife and habitat management.



Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project News - February 01-29, 2016

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project) activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico.  Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf.  Past updates may be viewed on either website, or interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visiting www.azgfd.gov/signup.  This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose.  The Project is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view semi-monthly wolf telemetry flight location information please visit  www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf/RWL.cfm

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to:  (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653.  To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

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Pima County Opposes Transfer of National Public Lands to the State

Board of Supervisors supports sportsmen’s access and local economies over short-term economic gain

TUCSON, Ariz. – Yesterday, the Pima County Board of Supervisors passed a resolution opposing any effort to transfer national public lands to the state of Arizona or local governments. The vote was held amid efforts by an Arizona State Legislature committee to examine processes to transfer, manage, and dispose of public lands within the state of Arizona.

The resolution recognizes the importance of public lands for:

  • Wildlife habitat and outdoor recreation, including hunting, fishing, hiking, backpacking, wildlife-watching, horseback riding, bicycling, and more.
  • Meeting the objectives of the Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan to maintain a network of interconnected lands where native habitat and natural corridors remain protected.
  • Attracting tourists and employing hundreds of county residents, who contribute in many positive ways to our community and spend their wages at local businesses.

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Endangered Species Updates - October 31, 2015

Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project Monthly Update - October 1-31, 2015

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project) activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), and New Mexico.  Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website atwww.azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf.  Past updates may be viewed on either website, or interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visitingwww.azgfd.gov/signup.  This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose.  The Project is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

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Arizona Elk Society Wildlife Water Management Program 2015

For several decades, development of waters to benefit wildlife populations has been a key management practice but the program has been challenged due to largely hypothesized adverse impacts such as the spread of diseases, increased predation, competition of other ungulates, and expansion of non-native pollinators (Rosenstock et al. 1999). One of the first references for the need to construct wildlife waters is found in one of the first texts on wildlife management (Leopold 1933) where the author stated that water was one of the three key components of wildlife habitat. While the practice of developing wildlife waters was unchallenged for many years, Broyles (1995) was one of the first who suggested that there was no supporting documentation that wildlife waters provided benefit to wildlife and in fact proposed that there were potential negative impacts associated with their development.

Opposition Letter to elected Officials about the threat of the President designating the Grand Canyon Watershed National Monument Proposal

April 22, 2015

President Barack Obama
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue Northwest
Washington, DC 20500

Dear Mr. Obama,

As concerned conservationists, we have received and reviewed the recent Conserving the Grand Canyon Watershed A Proposal for National Monument Designation prepared by the Center for Biological Diversity, the Grand Canyon Wildlands Council, and the Wilderness Society and we the Arizona Elk Society and our membership and supporters stand united in the opposition of this proposal. Within the above mentioned document, the proponents of this proposal attempt to justify designation of 1.7 million acres on the Arizona Strip as a National Monument but we believe much of their logic is fatally flawed. We will provide specific information about the management issues the proponents present but first want to point out that the area north of the Grand Canyon is both intensely and appropriately managed by the various state and federal agencies with statutory management authority for the area.

We also believe that the American public has the right to use and enjoy our natural heritage in diverse ways. Some people enjoy the wilderness experience and some enjoy other forms of recreation such as hunting, legal off-highway vehicle use, or just enjoying the beauty and solitude that the Arizona Strip and Kaibab Plateau has to offer. To meet the demands for all users of the land, we believe a diversity of management approaches is necessary. Changing the current management direction in the area being proposed for monument status would limit the ability of many legitimate recreationists without clear justification or benefit.

Endangered Species Updates - March 31, 2015

Mexican Wolf Blue Range Reintroduction Project Monthly Update
March 1-31, 2015

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project) activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), and New Mexico. Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website atwww.azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf. Past updates may be viewed on either website, or interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visitingwww.azgfd.gov/signup. This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose. The Reintroduction Project is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view weekly wolf telemetry flight location information or the 3-month wolf distribution map, please visit www.azgfd.gov/wolf. On the home page, go to the “Wolf Location Information” heading on the right side of the page near the top and scroll to the specific location information you seek.

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