ISSUES

As we identify key issues, the Arizona Elk Society will provide more background information and a sample letter to enable our members and others to voice their position to the decision makers on that issue.

The Arizona Elk Society, in support of our mission, is committed to:

    Thirst Elk drinking water provided by AES
  • Conserving and enhancing wildlife habitat in Arizona.
  • Protecting and promoting our hunting heritage.
  • Promoting sound wildlife management and habitat through partnering with government agencies and other organizations.
  • Implementing special programs for youth education regarding conservation, hunting and outdoor activities.
  • Informing the general public about issues concerning wildlife conservation, as well as scientific and biological wildlife and habitat management.



Arizona Game and Fish Game Program Newsletter - Spring 2016

Raymond Bison Herd

By Carl Lutch, Terrestrial Wildlife Program Manager Region 2

Many of you may have heard rumblings of the replacement of the current Raymond bison herd with new animals. The rumblings are true, but why is the Department taking such an action?

In order to understand where the Department is going, we must first look at and understand the past. Under Commission direction the Department manages two bison herds, one at Raymond Wildlife Area (RWA) and the other at House Rock Wildlife Area. The original sources of Arizona’s bison were from the last remaining wild herds roaming the TX/OK region and were brought to the North Kaibab in 1906 by Charles “Buffalo” Jones. Jones had crossed these bison with cattle in an attempt to make a hardier breed. That venture failed and in 1926 the state of Arizona bought the remaining animals and managed them ever since in House Rock Valley. In 1945, some of these bison were transferred to the newly acquired RWA.

Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project News - February 01-29, 2016

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project) activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico.  Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf.  Past updates may be viewed on either website, or interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visiting www.azgfd.gov/signup.  This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose.  The Project is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view semi-monthly wolf telemetry flight location information please visit  www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf/RWL.cfm

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to:  (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653.  To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

Read more ...

Pima County Opposes Transfer of National Public Lands to the State

Board of Supervisors supports sportsmen’s access and local economies over short-term economic gain

TUCSON, Ariz. – Yesterday, the Pima County Board of Supervisors passed a resolution opposing any effort to transfer national public lands to the state of Arizona or local governments. The vote was held amid efforts by an Arizona State Legislature committee to examine processes to transfer, manage, and dispose of public lands within the state of Arizona.

The resolution recognizes the importance of public lands for:

  • Wildlife habitat and outdoor recreation, including hunting, fishing, hiking, backpacking, wildlife-watching, horseback riding, bicycling, and more.
  • Meeting the objectives of the Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan to maintain a network of interconnected lands where native habitat and natural corridors remain protected.
  • Attracting tourists and employing hundreds of county residents, who contribute in many positive ways to our community and spend their wages at local businesses.

Read more ...

Endangered Species Updates - October 31, 2015

Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project Monthly Update - October 1-31, 2015

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project) activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), and New Mexico.  Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website atwww.azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf.  Past updates may be viewed on either website, or interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visitingwww.azgfd.gov/signup.  This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose.  The Project is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

Read more ...

Arizona Elk Society Wildlife Water Management Program 2015

For several decades, development of waters to benefit wildlife populations has been a key management practice but the program has been challenged due to largely hypothesized adverse impacts such as the spread of diseases, increased predation, competition of other ungulates, and expansion of non-native pollinators (Rosenstock et al. 1999). One of the first references for the need to construct wildlife waters is found in one of the first texts on wildlife management (Leopold 1933) where the author stated that water was one of the three key components of wildlife habitat. While the practice of developing wildlife waters was unchallenged for many years, Broyles (1995) was one of the first who suggested that there was no supporting documentation that wildlife waters provided benefit to wildlife and in fact proposed that there were potential negative impacts associated with their development.

Proposed Grand Canyon Watershed National Monument

From the Arizona Elk Society and the Arizona Alliance of Responsible Land Users:

The Arizona Elk Society has been working on this issue since 2010. Our Letter to Legislators and decision makers is on our website under the issue tabs.

For the past few months many of our followers and supporters have asked if we can provide talking points and information other than our letter. The big question that always comes up is “What can I do?” The Department has compiled a list of issues and concerns relative to Monument designation. For your consideration you can use this information should you choose to contact the decision makers of this action.

Here is what you can do. The elected officials that are the decision makers for this issue are listed below. You need to individually write and call these people and let them know how you feel about the Grand Canyon National Monument designation.

Please take the time to “GET INVOLVED”, these issues will determine the future of land use and access in Arizona. Use the points in this document to draft your comments then send it. If you do this please take a minute and let us know that you did this so we can keep track of the numbers and use those numbers when we are speaking with others.